Archive for the ‘How To’ Category

How To Pack Your Kiteboarding Gear For Vacations

Posted: December 21, 2013 by MACkiteboarding.com in How To, Jake Mitchell, kiteboarding general

A kiteboarding Golf Bag

by Jake Mitchell

One of the best attributes of kiteboarding is being able to do it in so many diverse locales, as long as a relatively open source of water is nearby. As vacations generally involve visiting places that meet that criteria, it can be quite hard to leave all your kitesurfing gear behind as you flee the winter doldrums. Fortunately, by getting an appropriate kiteboarding gear bag and learning how to effectively pack it, you’ll have no reason to leave your equipment behind.

The first step is selecting the correct travel bag that can successfully harbor all of your kitesurfing gear. Kiteboarding bags like the Dakine Club Wagon and Dakine SX Bag are great options. Occasionally called golf bags, the original intention with most kiteboarding bags was to disguise them as other sports equipment luggage that could take advantage of airlines’ free baggage policies. This leeway is increasingly rare with airline cost controls nowadays, but the influence lives on. The length of your kiteboard(s) is important when determining the size of bag to opt for; you will want a bag that is slightly longer than your largest kiteboard. Many kiteboarding bags, when packed correctly, should hold two kiteboards, at least two kitesurfing kites, a pump, harness, and water garb.

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How to Butter Slide/Nose Slide

Posted: November 22, 2013 by MACkiteboarding.com in How To, Jake Mitchell
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by Jake Mitchell

One of my favorite kiteboarding tricks is the butter slide, sometimes called a nose slide. It is quite easy to execute, given you have the right equipment, conditions, and a good sense of balance. Even more importantly, it looks really flashy, especially if you hold it for a long slide!

Progression Kiteboarding has a great video to get things started:

For another perspective, or if you’d prefer the butter slide dissected in Spanish:

The nose slide is executed most easily in flat water conditions, and will also look most the most pronounced. You will want to remove the fins from your kiteboard, and make sure your kite is moderately to highly powered. You can butter slide just fine in footstraps, although boots will provide better leverage. The trick is most easily done in the direction your feel more comfortable riding toeside.

Keep reading for step-by-step directions:

Our own world traveler, Nathan explains how to pack your kiteboard gear for your next vacation.  Protect your gear, Save Money, and Maximize your riding time!

Check it out here at MACkiteboarding.com  http://www.mackiteboarding.com/dakine-club-wagon-2013/

One of the inescapable hardships of kiteboarding comes in the form of losing your kiteboard. It happens to everyone, from the new kitesurfer to the advanced rider. And sometimes, after a particularly high velocity crash or in wavy conditions, it can seem impossible that you’ll ever recover your kiteboard with how far you were dragged. Naturally, that led to some kite surfers attaching leashes to their kiteboard so as to never lose it. You may find yourself asking the question, is a kiteboard leash right for me? The forthright answer to that question is no, you should not attach a board leash to your kiteboard. The answer boils down to simple physics.

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While kiteboarding already has a huge lightwind advantage over sports like windsurfing, everyone always wants to get the most riding time possible.  For most kiteboarders on a standard setup (12m Kite &140cm board for 175lb rider) rideable wind begins at about 15 mph.  This amount of wind is apparent because whitecaps become easily seen and prevalent on the water around 15 mph.  With this same setup jumping and powered riding will begin at around 17 mph.

2013 Cabrinha Crossbow LW Kiteboard Kite and Cabrinha Stylus kiteboard

2013 Cabrinha Crossbow LW Kiteboard Kite and Cabrinha Stylus kiteboard

One of the best things you can do to improve your lightwind riding is to become a better kite flyer.  Accomplished kite flyers can lose as much as 3 mph of wind and still be riding because they keep the kite moving in the power zone.  A good way to become a better kite flyer is simply flying in light-winds.  You can learn more in an hour of flying your kite in sub 12 winds than all your previous experience combined.  It is much more difficult to fly the kite in these winds and it is necessary to keep the kite moving.
Remember to pull in for more power when turning, then let the bar out to allow the kite to become more aerodynamic and rise in the sky.

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HQ Rush 350 Pro trainer kite

People often ask, “What’s the best trainer kite?” My answer is always the same, “It depends on what you are looking to do with it.” True, some trainer kites have additional features that make the flying experience a little easier; however, these additional features don’t necessarily make the kite the right choice for you.

Let’s start with the size of the kite. Trainer kites can be as small as 1.7 meters, or as big as 5 meters. These “meters” are surface meters, and every .5 meters you gain in size will give the user approximately 30% more pulling power.

To put this into perspective, let’s compare a Rush 300 (3 meter kite) to aRush 350 (3.5 meter kite). Where the Rush 300 has a wind range of 4-29mph, the Rush 350 has a wind range of 4-21mph. This means that a Rush 350 can be flown in lighter winds with the same amount of pulling power as a Rush 300 in a little stronger wind.

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A new kiteboarder on the beach

As a newbie, it can be a little intimidating the first few times, or more, when you show up at your new, local beach to go kiteboarding. When you look around, it appears that everyone else has it all together, and you probably feel like you’re sticking out like a sore thumb. Well – you probably are, but that’s OK. All of those same people out there ripping it up on the water had to start from the exact same spot that you now find yourself nervously standing on. Learning to kiteboard can be challenging if you like your privacy and don’t want to look like a kook in front of other people. Get over that – quick. Unless you have the luxury of private beaches or remote locations, you will be learning right alongside the intermediate and advanced level riders, and they will be watching you. They’re looking to see if you’ve taken some lessons and know a little bit about what you’re doing, or if you’re one of those half-cocked, do-it-yourself types that will no doubt make things dangerous for yourself and for those around you. Please note: don’t be that person – take lessons first. It will save you tons of time, speed up your learning process, and above all, educate you about safety, procedure and etiquette.

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