Posts Tagged ‘Grand Haven’

Check out the new Liquid Force Kites Teaser for all the new 2014 Kiteboarding Gear!  Will be available for viewing and demo at the 2013 King of the Great Lakes Test Fest (KOGL) on Sept. 27-29.

I think that this trailer might have been edited by the makers of the Twilight series.  You have been warned.

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Local Boy Cris Bobryk has more to come. Stay tuned with MACkite Surf Shop and BEST Kiteboarding

http://youtu.be/BpVOZh-xPwQ

While kiteboarding already has a huge lightwind advantage over sports like windsurfing, everyone always wants to get the most riding time possible.  For most kiteboarders on a standard setup (12m Kite &140cm board for 175lb rider) rideable wind begins at about 15 mph.  This amount of wind is apparent because whitecaps become easily seen and prevalent on the water around 15 mph.  With this same setup jumping and powered riding will begin at around 17 mph.

2013 Cabrinha Crossbow LW Kiteboard Kite and Cabrinha Stylus kiteboard

2013 Cabrinha Crossbow LW Kiteboard Kite and Cabrinha Stylus kiteboard

One of the best things you can do to improve your lightwind riding is to become a better kite flyer.  Accomplished kite flyers can lose as much as 3 mph of wind and still be riding because they keep the kite moving in the power zone.  A good way to become a better kite flyer is simply flying in light-winds.  You can learn more in an hour of flying your kite in sub 12 winds than all your previous experience combined.  It is much more difficult to fly the kite in these winds and it is necessary to keep the kite moving.
Remember to pull in for more power when turning, then let the bar out to allow the kite to become more aerodynamic and rise in the sky.

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HQ Rush 350 Pro trainer kite

People often ask, “What’s the best trainer kite?” My answer is always the same, “It depends on what you are looking to do with it.” True, some trainer kites have additional features that make the flying experience a little easier; however, these additional features don’t necessarily make the kite the right choice for you.

Let’s start with the size of the kite. Trainer kites can be as small as 1.7 meters, or as big as 5 meters. These “meters” are surface meters, and every .5 meters you gain in size will give the user approximately 30% more pulling power.

To put this into perspective, let’s compare a Rush 300 (3 meter kite) to aRush 350 (3.5 meter kite). Where the Rush 300 has a wind range of 4-29mph, the Rush 350 has a wind range of 4-21mph. This means that a Rush 350 can be flown in lighter winds with the same amount of pulling power as a Rush 300 in a little stronger wind.

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Kiteboarding kite safety system practiceOne of the reasons I have become so enamoured with the sport of kiteboarding is the ability to constantly progress, and, relatively speaking, the ease of doing so. Take wakeboarding for example. Sure, the board skills element is very much similar. However, throwing that front-roll comes at a much higher cost behind a boat than underneath a kite – due largely to the increased speed, you can really manage to hurt yourself. With kiteboarding, you can throw some pretty flashy tricks without the risk of serious injury. Therecovery time also tends to be far less – a usual botched attempt requires only a quick kite relaunch. Even with this accessibility, adding tricks to your kiteboarding repertoire can seem like a daunting task – and in reality, some are certainly going to be. But fortunately, a lot of your beginner and intermediate tricks are not that way, and this article is designed to help identify and remove those barriers that are holding you back from progressing while on the water.

1. Being comfortable with your kite

One of the most common problems people encounter when trying new things in kitesurfing is not being completely comfortable with their gear. With a few notable exceptions, kiteboarding kites have become very safe, possessing huge depower ranges and safety features to further eliminate power. But in order to benefit from these modern features, you have to know how to use and deploy them, and how to re-engage them as well. This means pull that QuickLink system, push the CPR system, identify the flagging line and engage it. Try it in low and high winds. Now safely reset it. Practice self-rescuing. Try to reverse launch your kite. Unhook your kite and let the bar go. Now get hooked back in and relaunch. Practice self-landing using the safety systems. Of course, do all this on a day when you have the beach largely to yourself, and ideally have someone there who can help coach you through it. Once you’ve gotten really comfortable with your kite, you’ll find yourself attempting tricks with a whole new level of confidence.

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12 films in 12 months.
A year in search of shred.
Different spots, different crews, different styles.
We don’t know exactly what’s going to happen, or where we’ll go.
But if it sounds fun, and it feels good, we’re in.

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NathanP-sq-250The week leading up to the first major storm of winter saw great anticipation of amazing conditions from those of us that favor the strongest winds with the largest waves. Tucker and I were on it – monitoring the weather throughout the week and especially the day before. We made the call the night before, planning on riding right when everything would be at its peak. The forecast called for gale force winds with 20′ significant wave heights – prime.

On Friday, I was woken up by my house shaking from the winds. Given the 20-degree temps outside and knowing the water would be in the sub-50 range, I began to shy away from the idea of heading out on such a nasty day. We made a call around noon to back off on riding, only to make a go of it around 4. Tucker and I headed for the beach with a 2013 Switchblade 7 and a 2012 Nomad 7, expecting winds in the mid-30kt range. We were very wrong.

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